10 grad school degrees worth the debt

If you're going to spend the time and money to attend graduate school, make sure you'll have job prospects when it's all over.

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VIDEO ON MSN MONEY

241Comments
Jun 20, 2014 1:16PM
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Sent my daughter to a major university for four years. She got a degree in business admin. It cost me about $80,000.00. She is a smart kid with a good GPA. It took her almost a year to get a job that pays 27k. My son went to trade school to be a welder. Within a year he was making $25.00 an hour and working consistently between 40 and 60 hours a week. He also has so much side work that he has to turn it away. I don't know what the future holds for each of them but it sure looks like the skilled trades are the way to go.
Jun 19, 2014 7:38PM
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No way an MBA is a good investment.  I have one and apparently so does everyone else.  Engineers seem to get them and then believe that they're qualified to be managers. 

My advice, only get an MBA if your boss tells you you need one or if the company is going to pay for it; and remember, just because you have one, doesn't mean you're actually now magically an effective manager.

Jun 20, 2014 11:46AM
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I know at least 3 people who graduated from college with me in 2012 with degrees in Business Management who cannot find  job!  One of them is working as a waitress in a restaurant.  I am a chemical engineer and did not have any problem getting a job and am always being recruited by other companies.    I also know a civil engineer who had some trouble getting a job but finally found one after a 2 year search.  Hey folks!  I am always amazed at the information which comes out of MSN.  Do you guys actually check your facts?  I believe the computer people have no problem but some of these are questionable.  You are messing with people's lives here by printing this garbage.
Jun 20, 2014 10:22AM
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As someone who has a Masters of SCIENCE in engineering, I would like to point out that advanced degrees in Engineering and SCIENCE are called MS, not MA.  As in, Masters of Science, not Masters of Arts.  Probably has something to do with those careers being worth the extra degree.
Jun 19, 2014 7:53PM
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These degrees might be worth the debt if you land a job in that respective field...but most people don't work in the field that their degree is in.
Jun 19, 2014 8:16PM
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Graduating in 2 mos with a degree in information systems, job offers on the table. 
Jun 19, 2014 7:40PM
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The degrees that count most is about 98.6 F.
Jun 19, 2014 8:56PM
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I love the stock photos they use in these articles. As if all these young somethings are wearing suits around with these degrees and in powerful management positions- pft. Most are working at McDonalds waiting for their "big gig" to finally come their way.
Jun 20, 2014 12:52AM
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Where do they get these figures?  
Jun 20, 2014 11:41AM
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Every single college student should be required to perform a cost/benefit analysis to determine how much money they can potentially make after graduation and how much student loan debt they will go into to get that job.
Jun 20, 2014 8:51AM
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The math behind this article is horrible.  It appears that they are using mid-career earning compared to someone without a degree.  In reality, a graduate degree should only be compared to the incremental earnings you would get over a bachelors degree in the same field.  Looking at most of these mid-career earnings numbers, they don't look much higher.  If the incremental earnings for a PhD is only a few thousand more than a masters degree, the payback is NOT seven or eight years.

 

For most of these fields, you do not need a masters or PhD to have a high paying job if you have a bachelors from a decent school with a good GPA.

Jun 19, 2014 8:55PM
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I specifically have gone out of my way to avoid the MBA. It's a giant pile of garbage. No one cares about how much you know about corporate culture, employee engagement- blah blah blah. Companies can teach you everything you'll learn in a traditional MBA program. If you don't have a major name behind that degree or unless your mid level career forces you to obtain one- fo-get-about-it.
Jun 20, 2014 10:35AM
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Factor in the ever increasing astronomical costs of living all the while as the wage scale slides backwards and then realize what a $hitty deal you're really getting. Nothing sucks worse than reality, and the reality is that the direction that the wheels are turning we are slowly but surely headed towards third worldism.
Jun 20, 2014 7:37AM
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HR: for those who can't do anything else.
Jun 19, 2014 11:00PM
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What all these articles neglect is the importance of a good GPA when coming out of school with any of these degrees.  If you graduate with a 2.0 in business management, you aren't going to get a decent job.  While all these fields are important and in demand, no good company wants to hire someone who is mediocre at best.  Major in something marketable, and do well in it.  Your job probably won't be much like school was, but if you can do well in school, you can probably do well at work.  
Jun 20, 2014 5:42AM
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Schools are nothing more than a money making business for 6 out of 10 students! They should have started in the blue collar sector with their life! Schools need the money and they know the feds will back them. This is why most educators don't like the military as it takes money away from the schools by providing instant employment without it! And then there is the Mafia Unions) "Period"!
Jun 20, 2014 11:08AM
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I took a MA in International Economics in 1957, went immediately into a an International trade and transportation startup and within 10 years was a partner with equity and earning six figures a year in salary plus share of profits.  Fifteen years after that I sold my interest and retired to a new career in Archaeology which was my dream job but which has few job opportunities other than teaching. With sufficient savings and investments from my International trade career, I was able to spend the last 30 years of my life engaging in Archaeological excavations and exploration around the world, still provide my children with college educations and my wife with a great life of travel and adventure. 
Jun 20, 2014 10:10AM
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Oh...and a masters in math will earn you WHAT?!  Hahahahahahaha.  Where do they get this stuff?!  More propaganda to feed the children to rack up their debt and cripple their effectiveness.  And these debt payoff figures???  Please...not grounded in reality.
Jun 20, 2014 8:56AM
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I have a Bachelor's and I only made more than $50,000 working two jobs.
Jul 1, 2014 10:14AM
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To all those folks posting comments, I earned a simple associates degree in the military, so did my wife.  university is expensive and there are so many degree choices to choose from these days, but my thoughts are no matter what higher education anyone gets, the rewards you receive is knowledge to become a better person in life.  Be it in blue collar world or white collar world.  The trick is making yourself marketable for employers to hire you.  This is becoming tougher in this day and age, but I feel that if you work hard to get that dream job, it will happen.  Good luck to everyone in life and hope you all reach your goals! 
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