5 cities running out of water

Absent some significant rainfall soon, residents of these communities will continue coping with inconvenient water restrictions as reservoirs dip to historical lows.

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261Comments
Aug 16, 2013 11:11AM
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Sign of the times to come. This is why conservation and sustainability is important. Climate is changing (for whatever reason you want) and we are ill prepared. We can't afford to pollute and waste water like we do now. We have got to start thinking long term and not short term $$$. This is likely to only get worse. The flip side is the same for people in areas that are now getting more rain than ever. I think its time we wised up and started getting better about changing our ways and being smarter and more responsible with the environment around us.
Aug 16, 2013 11:14AM
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Grass should not be grown in the desert. Just goes to show how stupid people are.
Aug 16, 2013 11:58AM
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Building in the desert and expecting grass to grow is insane.
Aug 16, 2013 1:38PM
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Water is going to be the new oil. When entire cities dry up, you start watching the price of water.
Aug 16, 2013 12:27PM
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Let's just keep building more homes and apartments in order to bring more and more people in.  That will take care of it.  lol
Aug 16, 2013 1:46PM
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To those denigrating the cities mentioned, consider that there is a FINITE amount of anything that we as a species consume.   The faster we use those resources, the faster the possibility of replenishing that resource diminishes.

 

Consider this:  from

In late 1999 the world's population reached 6 billion and was growing at an estimated 1.3% per year. This growth rate is characteristic of the last 100 years or so. World population reached 1 billion around 1790, 2 billion around 1927, and 4 billion in 1974.

Many people have expressed concerns about this rate of growth as well as the size of the world's population. If this growth rate remains constant, then world population will double every 50 years, giving a population of 12 billion by 2050, 24 billion by 2100, and so on. (Such growth is called geometric increase.) They say that current growth is unsustainable in that the natural resources to feed and house such populations will soon be depleted. In fact, some state that the world's current population is unsustainable. In other words, even if the world's population remained at 6 billion various natural resources would be in such short supply within a century that wars and mass starvation would result.

Aug 16, 2013 2:00PM
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Man has met his limit. There are natural limits to growth. One is water. One is food. And you need water to grow food. And you need land to grow food. You cannot keep building homes on farmland or you will have food shortages. And they are not making anymore land. Growth is not sustainable. America needs an immigration and population control policy now before its too late for US all.
Aug 16, 2013 1:30PM
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I think you should not move to Texas or Colorado.
Aug 16, 2013 10:58AM
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yay...my little hometown made the national news...wait...
Aug 16, 2013 1:21PM
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That is why I love MI, 1/2 hour in any direction and you are at a lake.

Aug 16, 2013 1:44PM
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Well at least Detroit has water. No money but plenty-O-water. I'm sure they'll find a way to screw that up too. Like selling it to other states but then stealing the profits....
Aug 16, 2013 1:46PM
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Too many people here in the US and on the Earth. 8 billion and growing! The world is overpopulated and we are overpopulated. We are out of balance with nature and the Earth's ability to replenish the water etc.....Soon we'll be running out of food. The Earth's resources are limited and finite and are rapidly being depleted. We are on a path to destruction unless we change our ways and soon. America needs an immigration and population policy, and so does the rest of the world. The UN has done nothing about this problem. And adding more people to the planet is not going to help things, but it will make everything worse. Elect leaders who will reverse this trend now. S.O.S.
Aug 16, 2013 12:30PM
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Next cities to run out of water are the ones with unchecked pollution problems, and ones with unregulated bottled water factories that are sucking up the water and trucking it away.
Aug 16, 2013 12:43PM
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I am afraid that you forgot to add Chihuahua, MX, El Paso and Juarez, Las Vegas, Guadalahara, Mexico City, Monterrey, MX,  Puebla, MX, Phoenix, Tuscon, and Yuma to your list of cities that are running out of water, all of which are bigger than Colorado Springs.  In-fact, Mexico City is bigger than all of the other above cities and every city on your list, put together!!!

Residents of Mexico City today enjoy an average daily water supply of 45 gallons, whereas the citizens of LA enjoy six times that.  The problem is that average runoff that supplies the aquifers of Mexico City has been declining by about 10% per decade since the 1970s, and in 2011 those aquifers only stood at 23% of capacity.  

Today the residents of El Paso are surviving on 40% of their historic normal supply, while the residents of Juarez, a city four times the size of El Paso, are surviving on 25% of their historic normal supply too.   This past winter runoff in the Rio Grande Basin was only 28% of normal and in the Colorado Basin runoff was only 42% of normal too.

What happens when Lake Mead, Lake Powell, and Elephant Butte Reservoir go dry and are then limited to annual runoff, which by itself has declined by half or more since 1970, seeing as how that water is a majority of the water supply?  So, what is going to happen to local property values in the affected cities when a mass-exodus starts due to a greatly reduced water supply?

Ackerman and Stanton is a good free source that also asks these hard questions from a high-end scientific perspective!  Is everyone aware that the US Bureau of Reclamation is all set to take extraordinary steps to attempt to keep Lake Mead and Lake Powell from falling below their water intakes, which include further reducing downstream water rights by another 10%?



I have a list of current sources on this subject that is over 20 pages long on Word if anyone is interested.  None of the sources are more than 5 years old and more than half are from 2013!
Aug 16, 2013 1:49PM
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Move all business to Great Lakes areas if you need water. We have all the water and skilled labor you need but don't even think about a pipeline. Oil is great to burn but is not as tasty as a glass of cool water!! Maybe we can trade some water for oil straight up or maybe we could charge a little more to curb our tax rates!  I'm going for a swim!!
Aug 16, 2013 1:49PM
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What are beer prices in those areas? It is always a better choice instead of bottled water.
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The climatologists are going to have a field day with this.
Aug 16, 2013 2:02PM
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That what happend to the Pueblo Indians.
Aug 16, 2013 11:45AM
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If  we can build an oil pipeline across the US from border to border then...
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