Home for sale © Ingram Publishing, SuperStock

The government shutdown is here. Whether it's not being able to get a new Social Security card or visit a national park, Americans will immediately feel the effects. But there's one bright spot of the economy that stands to be affected as well: housing.

One of the biggest questions regarding the shutdown and how it will affect housing has revolved around the mortgage market, specifically prospective buyers' access to new home loans. After all, more than 90% of all loan activity is underwritten, insured, or owned by the government and its affiliated entities.

Initially at least, the mortgage market is likely to be only minimally impacted. New loans will continue to push through most government agency pipelines. What will change is how long the process takes, as many agencies expect to experience delays.

Mortgages purchased and securitized by Fannie Mae Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac Freddie Mac will be unaffected because their operations are paid for by fees charged to lenders. And the Department of Veterans Affairs will continue to guarantee mortgages for Americans that have served in the military since these loans are funded by user fees as well.

But if the government shutdown of 1995-1996 is any indicator, the process will take longer than usual. "Loan Guaranty certificates of eligibility and certificates of reasonable value were delayed," the VA warned in its September 25th contingency plan.

Where there has been mounting concern is the Federal Housing Administration, which currently endorses about 15% of the entire single-family mortgage market. Several media outlets recently reported that the FHA would be unable to endorse any single-family loans and that no staff would be available underwrite and approve new loans.

That prospect would be somewhat worrisome -- if it were actually true. The FHA's Office of Single Family Housing will indeed remain open for business, albeit with a smaller staff. "FHA will be able to endorse single family loans during the shutdown. A limited number of FHA staff will be available to underwrite and approve new loans," the report now states. In other words, other lenders' loans will continue to be insured and some in-house lending will continue to take place at a reduced rate.

The reason for that mix-up: the initial draft of the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development's contingency plan mistakenly stated that single-family loan operations would cease. The report was amended over the weekend.

The FHA's single-family loan operations are funded through multi-year appropriations, meaning their budget is not tied to the government's standoff over funding for the new fiscal year that starts in October. On the other hand, what will be more affected is the agency's Multifamily Housing Office, which is funded through yearly appropriations.

"Because we are able to endorse loans, we don't expect the impact on the housing market to be significant, as long as the shutdown is brief," continues the HUD report. "If the shutdown lasts and our commitment authority runs out, we do expect that potential homeowners will be impacted, as well as home sellers and the entire housing market."

Click here to become a fan of MSN Money on Facebook

One government lender that will indeed suspend its home loan activity, however, is the Department of Agriculture. The USDA says that no new housing loans or guarantees will be issued through its Rural Development programs in a shutdown. The department also warns that such a scenario could cause "a setback in construction start-up," and if the shutdown lasts for an extended period, "a substantial reduction in housing available in rural areas relative to population."

"The government doesn't generally approve loans, they basically just insure them," says Don Frommeyer, president of the National Association of Mortgage Brokers and a vice president at Amtrust Mortgage Funding. "For the most part you aren't going to see much of a hit in the mortgage market unless it goes for a long period of time."

More from Forbes