5 gifts to business from the Supreme Court

The justices have sided strongly with companies in several decisions in its current session, which ends this week.

By Kim Peterson Jun 24, 2013 3:53PM
Image: United States Supreme Court (© Hisham F Ibrahim/Photodisc Red/Getty Images)The Supreme Court had a soft spot for businesses this year, coming to their aid time and again.

Even though the Roberts Court has long been considered business-friendly, this time around the justices went even further by setting some big precedents, The Wall Street Journal reports. Most notably, the court made it much harder to bring class-action lawsuits against companies. The current session ends this week.

Here are five court rulings that smiled on businesses this year, according to the newspaper:

Class-action strikedown. Subscribers in Philadelphia sued Comcast (CMCSA) for overcharging and using anticompetitive tactics. The court rejected the case, saying the subscribers didn't have a good way to figure out monetary damages in a victory.

No more overseas rights cases. The justices looked at a case involving Royal Dutch Shell (RDS.A) and basically put the brakes on any cases claiming that companies were complicit in overseas human-rights abuses.

Another class-action strikedown. The court essentially killed a class-action lawsuit over American Express (AXP) card fees, saying merchants had to honor a contract with the company. Restaurants and other individual businesses had claimed it would be too expensive for them to sue American Express on their own, and they had hoped to join as a class to save money.

Tougher discrimination cases. The court made a ruling that could affect future lawsuits about discrimination in the workforce. The justices said that a person must be able to hire and fire to be considered a supervisor in those lawsuits, which makes it harder to blame a business for racism or sexism from its employees, The Associated Press reports.

Pay your own legal fees.
The justices ruled that a Colorado woman must pay the legal costs of her suit against General Revenue Corp. (SLM) after she lost her harassment case against the debt collector.

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Tags: AXPCMCSA
20Comments
Jun 24, 2013 4:39PM
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The supreme court is as unpredictable as the weather - except when it comes to support of corporate interests and weakening consumer protection.  What can you say?  Money talks.
Jun 24, 2013 4:41PM
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Go To The Source,

What else would one expect when five out of the nine 'esteemed' justices were placed there by administrations who were blatantly cozy and in debt to the Fortune 500 Corporations, their CEO's and their Wall Street banker / financiers. It's the old adage ...."whenever in doubt, follow the money", and our SCOTUS is no different. All of them, the 'liberal arm' of four included, know full-well, exactly and by whom their bread has been buttered, and since the dawn of the corporation, it's been like that for over a century. If anyone actually thinks that this group of cloak and dagger interpreters of the law at the highest level has anything in mind that approaches equality, parity or true justice for the common American citizen... think again. It's a gigantic smokescreen and sham.

 

Peace to all ~

Jun 24, 2013 5:57PM
Jun 24, 2013 5:16PM
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How is it possible to lose a harassment Law Suit against a debt collector?
Jun 24, 2013 6:19PM
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No surprise here. Business and corporate interests own this country. Their employees are called Congressmen, Justices, Senators, Wall Street Investment Bankers and lobbyists. They have stolen our country.
Jun 24, 2013 5:54PM
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If you can't hire or fire you are not a supervisor. Very interesting and impartial reasoning right?
Jun 24, 2013 7:15PM
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Most of these are no-brainers, like the supervisor one.

Pay your own legal fees-----nice!
Jun 25, 2013 8:23AM
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Ah the GOP, eliminating rights for individuals versus corporations one conservative ruling at a time. If corporations are people too, make corporations pay individual tax rates also. Enough of corporate takers and freeloaders.

Jun 24, 2013 7:20PM
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ALL YOU CONSERVATIVES WANTED A RIGHT LEANING COURT.....NOW YOU GOT WHAT YOU WANTED, A COURT THAT WORKS FOR THE CORPORATOCRACY....Don't worry it won't be long and we will all be "Serfs in the Serfdom" working for our corporate master for pennies while they fill their pockets with gold.

 

I'm going to laugh like hell from the grave when all those 18 year old to 40 year old Republican voters get to their retirement age and/or start getting sick and there isn't a social safety net for them and Wall Street will have squandered all their 401K and other retirement funds AND THEN THEY GOT NOTHING !!!!!  Of course they will blame the Democrats because they can't blame their own Party.

Jun 24, 2013 9:11PM
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"No surprise here. Business and corporate interests own this country. Their employees are called Congressmen, Justices, Senators, Wall Street Investment Bankers and lobbyists. They have stolen our country."

 

So prepare yourself to vote in this coming election cycle. Do your research, read between the lines and shut the media OFF. We have an amazing chance to sweep the crap that clogs our Congress OUT. It will take ALL of US to do it correctly. I live in Michigan-- the Governor, House and Senate are not doing what the citizens need and want. They have their own agenda. We will see our government start fresh. As for the Supreme Court... the goal isn't to wave your fist when they lean to corporate interests, it's to identify the weaknesses in those interests and turn them back on the corporations. If you go to work and take it because you fear the alternative... please update your passport and relocate. You are scum. If you inherited or hired-in to a cushy corporate life, draw a bulls eye on your forehead, it will keep the unintended victim hits down. We have war coming.

Jun 25, 2013 12:25AM
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Money equals power, and visa versa. it has taken a long time for the Supreme Court to evolve in its' present state. With any luck, there still might be a middle class when a more liberal majority has power.
Jun 24, 2013 7:19PM
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All these closet communists on this thread boohoohooing.

C'mon you hate all corporations, that means you're a communist, just admit it.  You want a dirty little craphole country like Venezuela with a state-run economy where everybody's poor and they run out of toilet paper.

Here's a thought, idiots:  if corporations ran this country, they wouldn't have to comply with hundreds of thousands of pages of regulations, and their tax rate would be 5%.  Or maybe 0%.  Not just 1 company.  All of them.
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