Google's summer interns make for noisy neighbors

Residents of an upscale San Jose apartment complex are ruing the day these seasonal workers moved in and started partying.

By Aimee Picchi Jul 9, 2013 3:16PM

The Google logo is seen on a podium and projected on a screen at Google headquarters in Mountain View, Califorina Paul Sakuma/AP Residents of Crescent Village in San Jose, Calif., probably didn't feel very lucky the day hundreds of Google (GOOG) interns moved in. 


The interns have created havoc at the upscale apartment complex, where units rent for as much as $3,200 a month and include the use of the swimming pools, tennis courts, a fitness center, a gaming room and a 23-seat movie theater, New York magazine's Intelligencer reports. 


The problem started when Google, which is known for its lavish pay and perks, offered this year's summer interns the opportunity to live in shared apartments at Crescent Village. In previous years the search giant simply provided housing stipends. 


While it's not known how many interns took Google up on the offer, a closed Facebook group for Crescent Village Google interns had almost 400 members last week, New York notes. 


The issue highlights the increasing number of dilemmas involving the relationship of employers to their interns. While most of the debate has focused on pay -- a recent court decision ruled that 20th Century Fox violated wage laws by not paying interns -- this case raises the question of how much responsibility a company bears for the off-hours behavior of its interns.


Google's interns certainly aren't suffering for lack of pocket change. They reportedly earn almost $6,000 a month, more than many American workers and almost unheard for an internship.


What's so bad about living with Google interns? 


Noise, parties, hot-tubbing and unsafe pedestrian behavior (like darting out into traffic) rank among the complaints of other residents. The management of the complex recently distributed a flyer reminding tenants to "be considerate," but it didn't name Google interns as the reason for the reminder. 


Some residents have turned to Yelp (YELP) to vent their frustrations, with one writing on July 2 that Crescent Village is "like a dorm now. I could hear a lot of noise, people talking and singing even in the middle of the night."


Google declined to comment on Crescent Village, though it told New York that it had reminded the interns to be respectful. 


Will a few reminders be enough to rein in a group of well-funded young geeks? Not even Google may be able to answer that question.


Follow Aimee Picchi on Twitter at @aimeepicchi. 


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2Comments
Jul 9, 2013 4:16PM
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HAHA I live here, The Google bus comes to my complex every morning to pick up Google employees. Most are very young and I agree that they tend to be very loud
Jul 10, 2013 1:04PM
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Funny how even Google interns user Facebook over Google+
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