Cashing in on your collectibles

Those tchotchkes and toys you've got stored in the attic and piled up in the corner of your garage may be valuable.

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VIDEO ON MSN MONEY

128Comments
May 10, 2013 12:50AM
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This was a lame article and lacked any real depth of knowledge of the subject. Please find sommeone who knows something about collectibles to actually write about them.

 

You missed major bank on items such as vintage Hotwheels, Corgis & Matchbox cars, comic books, baby boomer toys, disney anything, Lladro, Hallmark Ornaments!!!

 

Holy cow you can have christmas ornaments worth hundreds of dollars in a box and not know it! These are things everyone has a chance of having in their house.

 

Cigars? I mean really? Aside from them not being good for you, they are nthing more than an indulgent habit. Now Cigar labels on the other hand...

May 9, 2013 9:33PM
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They fail to tell for example that the only baseball cards anyone is willing to actually pay for are pre-1975 or so. Also, if you try to sell your collectibles at auction the auction house will take a 35% to 40% commission. And then it is a gamble that there will be at least two bidders out of the many who show up at the action who want what you have to sell or they go at give away prices. In other words, selling your collectibles can be every bit a crap shoot.
May 9, 2013 8:16PM
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shame there wasnt more contact info to find out more about collectables!
May 13, 2013 6:48AM
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They actually have more in-depth detail on an artical if it involves Kim K or any of those turds. Who ever wrote this, go back and do it again and this time get it right. Just tackle it with as much relishment as a Kim K or Kanye story.
May 13, 2013 7:37AM
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I WISH IT WAS THAT EASY TO SELL COLLECTABLES. I HAVE 1OOO'S OF 1971 THRU  1989 BASEBALL CARDS. (TOPPS,

FLEERS, DONUS & ECT.) MAY BE I'M DOING SOMETHING WRONG. EVERY BODY SAYS IT'S EASY,I  DON'T THINK SO.I'VE

PUT THEM ON EBAY AND HAD NO LUCK.IF ANY ONE CAN HELP I WOULD APPRECIATE IT.  J.

May 9, 2013 9:31PM
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an item collectible antique ect  is only worth what someone is willing to pay for it . the more obscure the more valuable . the market is currently flooded with pez and star wars . Ebay is not the only way to go .... look into heritage auctions out of dallas , mears auction out of milwaukee . If you have vintage items these are the people to contact .
May 13, 2013 9:00AM
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If you collect something, buy what you like and enjoy them.  Don't buy as an investment.  Of course, you can make money selling things that are truely collectible (something that has a higher demand than supply). NEVER buy something that is sold as "collectible" or "limited edition" because they are not an investment.  I have about 40 boxes of 1990's era Matchbox, Hotwheels, Johnny Lightning, NASCAR diecast, GI Joes, HESS gas station trucks, Starting Lineups, baseball and football cards...  that I bought as an "investment" that I can't sell because 20 other guys have them for sale at below cost on eBay.
May 13, 2013 7:19AM
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well what about old coins from 1778 i have multiple of them and i have old 100 dollar bills and 500 dollar bills from world war 1 how much do you think i could get from that?

 

May 13, 2013 8:53AM
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Please Put more to your story's you leave people going What Huh ? where's the rest.

May 13, 2013 6:25AM
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wow so vague guess whoever wrote this new what they were thinking just couldn't print it
May 13, 2013 10:07AM
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My husband has hundreds of baseball cards from the 80s and 90s he had from childhood. They are not worth anything, and no one seems to want them. We tried to sell them, and had no luck at all.....
May 13, 2013 12:25PM
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I opened my first collectibles store in 1985.  Then it was a daily occurrence for someone in their 30s or older to come in and tell me their "my mother threw them away" story.

Now, 30 years later, guys in their 30s and older come in with their collection of 80s and 90s cards thinking they are going to get rich, and I have to tell them their cards are worthless and will still be worthless 100 years from now.  My advice is to donate them to a children's hospital and take the tax write off.

May 13, 2013 9:30AM
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So what if a person has some collectibles that might interest someone else; ones too valuable to sell at a garage sale - where is the appraiser or sale contact information ??  Just knowing one has items of interest doesn't help unless there is a reputable outlet for them.
May 13, 2013 9:57AM
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Yes please throw them out so mine will be more valuable!
May 13, 2013 9:14AM
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I am interested in your 1971, 1972 and 1976 Topps baseball cards.  How do i reach you and what are you asking for the cards?
May 13, 2013 10:40AM
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i collected cards when little. baseball, football and basketball cards. recently started collecting again because miss the hobby. instead of buying packs, i just collect rookie cards. i dnt see it as investments i just enjoy collecting them. and yeah, my wife still roll her eyes. she doesnt get it

May 13, 2013 9:22AM
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One thing I think I only saw under the maps section is that CONDITION is critical to pretty much any collectible. You could have a baseball card that some catalog says is worth $1000 but that's in near perfect condition. Any flaw whatsoever will GREATLY reduce the actual value. Those who buy collectibles from an "investment" standpoint generally want the best condition they can get while true collectors often won't mind as much as long as the price is right, especially for more desirable pieces.
May 13, 2013 12:38PM
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I have known a lot of people who have just sat around 'collecting' dust.
May 13, 2013 11:25AM
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When it comes to collectibles, there are three key "prices" for everything.  What the price guide says it's worth, what a dealer will sell it for, and what a dealer will pay for it.  The price guide price is worthless.  Means nothing.  I have stuff in my store that is priced less than half the guide price, and other stuff priced more than double.  If I have a card in my store priced $100, and you bring me an identical one to sell, I might pay as much as $50, and as little as nothing.  If I have 10 of them and haven't sold one in years, I'm not buying one at any price.  Chances are the price guide says $200 and I still can't sell one for half that, and chances are if someone offered me $50 I would ask him how many he wanted at that price.  On the other hand if that was the only one I had and I knew it would sell quickly, I would gladly pay $50 for another one.

If you really want to know what things are selling for, check the ebay completed auctions.  That's what I do before i price anything.

May 13, 2013 10:38AM
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I am sure you have $20 to buy some baseball cards. Whether they are from 1989 or 2000, buy the cards to keep for another 20 years. The reason to buy cards is to support the economy. The person you give $20 to buys something else, which supports someone else, and the cycle repeats. Collecting cards is nostalgic, and who cares if they produced millions of the same card. The fun is in the collecting.
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