10 things to know about Social Security

Familiarize yourself with strategies that can help maximize benefits or protect loved ones in the event of your death.

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385Comments
Nov 18, 2012 11:16AM
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 Social Security is a retirement supplement, and an important one.  It is true that Social Security funds have been used to invest in US Gov Bonds.  So the fund is now tied into a trust that the US will pay on those bonds and keep the fund solvent.  I trust the government as long as Republicans stay out of power.  Republicans want to PRIVATIZE the Social Security Fund.  People on retirement or near retirement need to understand that this will END IT of all of us.  Do you think you will have a voice at the Board of Directors meeting?  You have a voice at the ballot box and you had better use it!
Nov 18, 2012 11:16AM
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The Congress is full of thieves and liars. We , the people, end up paying for it. Eliminate the special retirement and medical benefits for Congress.
Nov 18, 2012 11:13AM
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Payroll tax cuts are contributing to the shortfall in Social Security benefits.
 
 
 
Nov 18, 2012 11:12AM
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Mitt Romeny and Clint Eastwood are reported to have formed an Alaskan Native Hedge Fund targeting the purchase of all the frozen igloos on the northern coast and trading them to China for cooling summer evening parties, however, last reported, the Eskimoos were chasing Mitt and Clint with harpoons for attempting to pay the Eskimoos with Confererate money. Last seen, Eastwood was running south to an Anchorage airport, carrying with him the empty mystical "chair", and Romeny was seen trying to climb into the chair and using his cell phone to call Trump for a limo asap.

 

This story has been seriously denied by Romeny election guru Carl Rove, who claims he knows the real story and insists his daa base is accurate except for a few no-no's that could happen to anybody.

 

 

 

 

    

Nov 18, 2012 11:11AM
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Next time you post article, make sure you put all the info - not just teaser info. The part about collecting half of your ex-partners SS - you forgot to mention, you can not be remarried to do that.

Nov 18, 2012 10:49AM
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Yes, and some keep talking about that SS will run out of MY MONEY--that would mean a new Greek Situation at once with riots and people will steal all government properties, and sell it  (like the government does to collect SS taxes some times to people)--I suppose that is why USA has 6-10 times more police than real northern Western Countries, they actually do know here that the money they have stolen will have to be paid, and they obviously have no money left after raiding SS, to pay for Paul Ryan's college and other mismanaging SS situations.--and remember if you did not pay your 17,000 last year-- in my case always double SS--they come here with police and jail threats to harass and collect those "TAXES" which is nothing more than my own money they took directly without any deductions (even when we lost a million in flood damage), I can see why some here want lots of guns, because they can not trust the USA and State government.

However we did payd almost 6,000 billion in subsidies last year just to agriculture directly and indirectly, yes even part of AG universities, never mind auto industry, never mind space science,  never mind thousands of technical projects, like computer chips I work on, so we can compete with the rest of the globe. 

I simply want my money back, and I have paid 1,260,000 Dollars adjusted for official inflation calculated on when/year I paid, and that does include Medicare as well, and that of course also includes the same interest rate the Feds charge banks for money, after all the Feds borrowed the money from me. But I can live about 10,000 Years with what I get paid each year on what I have paid.

--Oh and the first thing they then do, is collect 125 Dollars a month anyway for medicare INS (I thought they were kidding), and then charge taxes of my money, THEY CALL MY MONEY BENEFITS AT THIS POINT, WOW I WAS FORCED TO PAY MY BENEFIT TAX ALL THESE YEARS!, that must be because of all that inflation and interest I have earned on that money.

Wake up USA, this is the biggest lie we have in the USA government!

FREEDOM, FREEDOM!

Nov 18, 2012 10:46AM
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Face it,  the American public is the last thing on the "good ole' boy's minds".  The system is broken, and the only way to fix it is for the American people to get together, stay together and let Washington know we want it fixed and we want it done now.  Then put responsible people in office who will work for the American people, not special interest groups and not themselves.  I am willing to take that stand, is everyone else?  I have 47 years invested in SS and Medicare.  What do I have to lose?

Nov 18, 2012 10:43AM
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Pundits like the Koch Bro's want you to think SS is broke. That we can no longer afford to FEED senior citizens.  There is a 2.6 Trillion Dollar account with SS's name on it. All we have to do is make against the LAW for the FEDERAL government to barrow money from it. It would only become a Ponzi scheme if we let the GOP wana be's try to have people investing there retirement funds in the stock market. Is there no end to how these sharks want to pray on the elderly?
Nov 18, 2012 10:30AM
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SOCIAL SECURITY AND POLITICS SUCKS.. I WORKED FOR FIFTY YEARS  AND ALL I GET IS 944.00 DOLLARS..I DO NOT QUALIFY FOR MEDICAID OR ANY OTHER HELP BECAUSE ACCORDING TO RULES I HAVE ENOUGH INCOME TO LIVE WELL..

BUT I SEE ALLFOREIGNERS FROM PRACTICALLY EVERY COUNTRY IN THE WORLD  SHOPPING WITH GOVERMENT DEBIT CARDS..GETTING FOOD STAMPS & GETTING RENT SUBSIDIES....

Nov 18, 2012 10:08AM
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Go after all the politicians that came out of Washington millionaires for the last 50 years. Get their money first.
Nov 18, 2012 9:54AM
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Social security is welfare. only the rich earn their paychecks here in America everyone else is just a worthless freeloader. If you dont believe me just ask someone who runs our corporate funded think tanks.
Nov 18, 2012 9:30AM
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I plan on doing my share to help SS....I will begin taking money ASAP (@ 62) vs. waiting until 67.

 

The break even point, pay out wise, would come in my mid 70s. If I live to 90, I will end up with less money. I am willing to take that risk for the greater cause.

 

 

Nov 18, 2012 9:22AM
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http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mreoepVCJHs
The truth about Social security is that the debt is not effecting it. It is in surplus.
Nov 18, 2012 8:29AM
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The reason they take from SS its bcause, just like all corp. greed, its money just sitt'n for the taking. So we have a Gov. corp. that thinks the same way. Hey lets take from this kitty, pay for this. We go longer than most nations, but babyboomers might be a bit much for SS. I found it just a bit funny, when babyboomers were at the prime age to retire. 2008 hit,  No one can now go out, or might have to work a little longer. With 16 trillion and climbing, SS might be a thing of the past. No one else is helping, bankrupt on credit cards, bankrupt on houses, now student loans. All what we work for, our golden age might be easy pick'n. Next Generation, and Obama just take, and take, and take. They voted him in hoping to pass all this to the rich, once again...take, take, take...thats all they know what to do...
Nov 18, 2012 8:15AM
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Fixing the problem is not as complicated as it seems.  Everyone needs to stop pointing fingers and spouting anger at past decisions and how the fund was managed.  We have a problem--we can fix it.  First, totally eliminate the cap on taxable earnings. Why should those that make astronomical amounts of money get a pass, paying a low percentage of their earnings into the system, while others pay on 100% of their earnings?  Second, the government needs to make an infusion of cash to bolster the fund.  Third, freeze COLAs for a time.  Most retirement systems don't have annual cost of living adjustments, but may periodically make an adjustment (I suggest every 5 years).  Fourth, raise the number of quarters required to participate from 40 to 80.  Most folk work 20 years.  And finally, eliminate the "early retirement" option.
Nov 18, 2012 7:53AM
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They forgot to mention SS is a ponzi scheme... the dollars you get are worth less than the dollars you put in, tax rates at withdrawal are guaranteed to be higher than at the time of pay in, US fiat dollars are intrinsically worthless, all ponzi schemes fail, generally it is not legal to tax a tax, dollars put in are held in trust by the unscrupulous federal government and spent on a multitude of other artifices so your funds don't actually exist anywhere (pure felonious activity), certain completely legal activities can cause cessation of payments, since all politicians are liars why would anyone reasonably accept promised benefits to be paid, the word "entitlement" doesn't appear in the Constitution or the Bill of Rights making SS a benefit not a right--a government benefit can be rescinded at any time, the federal government is insolvent from continued and ongoing fiscal negligence of the two major political parties ... there is more but this is enough for a prelude to failure (© 2012). Refer to your Plan B, probably more reliable than the federal government which is in the pre-Greece phase as  you read.
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Clinton robbed from SS and other intergovernmental holdings to pay down debt.
This gave the ILLUSION of a surplus. The fact is, there NEVER was a surplus. The American people are easily duped. They rely on the media and their elected officials to tell them the truth, neither one does.
Millions of baby boomers will be retiring over the next decade. This will strain the system even more.
Nov 18, 2012 6:39AM
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If government did not grow to the size it is! And the greedy basturds left it alone there would be enough to pay every person for the next 100 years!!!!!
Nov 18, 2012 5:26AM
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Do Members of Congress Pay Social Security Taxes?

Lawmakers do pay 8 percent of their salaries into their pension system, although this only compensates for about 1/5 of the typical lifetime benefit. We cover the rest as taxpayers.

Member of Congress began to pay into Social Security in 1983, as part of a government-wide pension overhaul.

In addition, Members of Congress DO NOT draw the “same pension” as their pay in the last year of office as suggested in a rumor circulating on the Internet; only federal judges do that under the term “retirement pay.” Still, the formula is quite generous, and, with 20-25 years, a Member of Congress could retire with up to 80 percent of his or her salary replaced. Of course, the only cap on how fast their benefits rise is the rate of increase in CPI. For this reason, Congressional pensions can and frequently do exceed a Member’s final salary, but only after a few years in retirement, when COLAS begin to kick in.

In the final analysis, Congressional pension benefits are 2-3 times more generous than what a similarly-salaried executive could expect to receive upon retiring from the private sector. That ought to be enough to concern any taxpayer.

Nov 18, 2012 5:08AM
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What money?? We are just throwing our money into a bottomless pit and when I retire I'm sure social security wont be there. Also I have no faith in the 401K I've been sinking money into for all these years and I'd be surprised if I get any of that either.

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