Senior woman looking at budget and bills © digitalskillet, Getty Images

Your 2014 resolutions have been committed to paper. You are full of confidence that this year will be the year your life really comes together. You vow not to repeat past mistakes. You are ready for 2014.

You hope.

In case you have any doubt about how the year is going to go, however, you may want to make sure your fiscal house is in order before the new year quickly becomes the same-old-same-old year. After all, many New Year's resolutions revolve around money. The federal government even has a New Year's resolutions site with links to resources to help the public stay on track. Of the 13 resolutions it lists, three are money-focused (getting a job, saving money and managing debt).

So before you get caught up in day-to-day living and forget all those resolutions about watching your bank account, making more money, paying off credit card debt and not buying things you don't need, consider a money checklist for the new year. Do any of the following, and your finances in 2014 should see an improvement over 2013.

Meet with a financial adviser

If you haven't had a discussion with a financial advisor in ages, or ever, this is a suggestion from just about every personal finance expert -- especially financial advisors. But that doesn't mean it isn't a good idea.

"It's an invaluable tool, almost like having a Swiss army knife in your pocket," says Andy Smith, a certified investment advisor in Indianapolis and co-host of "The Mutual Fund Show," a national radio show.

If you don't have a financial adviser and don't feel you're in the market for one for a while, you can always talk to your spouse or another family member, a friend or perhaps the manager at your bank, depending on what advice you think you need.

Smith also notes that many employers offer retirement planning advice through their 401k plans.

Look at your taxes

If you typically do your taxes hours before the April 15 deadline, this could be your year to change that. You could make sure your receipts are in order or schedule an appointment with a tax preparer and pay early, especially if you know you're getting a refund.

"If you are due for a refund, it's better to have the money back to you as soon as possible," says Joseph Cunningham, assistant professor of accounting at Albright College in Reading, Pa. "Why wait to file your return on April 15 and receive a refund up to eight weeks later?"

Budget

If you haven't created a budget in a year or more or you haven't looked at your budget in eons, update it. Something has probably changed. Perhaps your cable company raised its rates, without you really noticing or thinking about it. Maybe you bought an iPhone over the summer and your monthly phone bill shot up, but you didn't reduce other monthly expenses. Maybe you adopted a dog in the fall and never thought to add the cost of pet supplies to your budget.

This is the time to study how your budget changed in 2013, especially if you were having trouble paying bills at the end of the year. Are there expensive home improvements you want to tackle this year, like buying a new heating or cooling system or putting on a new roof? Plan to take a particularly expensive vacation? If you think it's going to be a rough year, and even if you think it'll be swell, now is a smart time to engage in a fiscal cleansing. Cancel subscriptions you never utilize and contact some of the places you do business with -- your cable company, for example -- to see if they can offer you a better monthly deal.

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