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The Massachusetts Democrat says it's a 'no-brainer' that pay discrepancies between men and women need to be addressed.

By Credit.com Thu 12:53 PM

This post was written by Sen. Elizabeth Warren for partner site Credit.com.


Credit.com on MSN MoneyI honestly can’t believe that we’re still arguing over equal pay in 2014.


When I started teaching elementary school after college, the public school district didn't hide the fact that it had two pay scales: one for men and one for women. Women have made incredible strides since then. But 40 years later, we’re still debating equal pay for equal work.


Senator Elizabeth Warren, a Democrat from Mass. © Jacquelyn Martin/AP
Women today still earn only 77 cents for every dollar a man earns, and they’re taking a hit in nearly every occupation. Bloomberg analyzed Census data and found that median earnings for women were lower than those for men in 264 of 265 major occupation categories. In 99.6 percent of occupations, men get paid more than women. That’s not an accident; that’s discrimination.


The effects of this discrimination are real, and they are long lasting. Today, more young women go to college than men, but unequal pay makes it harder for them to pay back student loans. Pay inequality also means a tougher retirement for women. In Massachusetts, the average woman who collects Social Security will receive about $3,000 less every year compared to a man in a similar position, because benefits are tied to how much people earn when working.

 

There is a growing trend among 30-somethings to cover the costs of their weddings themselves.

By MSN Money Partner Thu 12:42 PM

This post comes from Krystal Steinmetz at partner site Money Talks News


Money Talks News on MSN MoneyThe days of the bride's parents footing the bill for a lavish wedding are on their way out.


Bridesmaids © FEV Create Inc, Getty Images

Nearly 25 percent of weddings are paid for by the bride and groom alone, Reuters said. If the couple is over age 30, that number increases to 30 percent, according to David Wood, president of the Association of Bridal Consultants.


Just 10 years ago, only about 15 percent of couples covered the costs of their wedding. And back in the '70s, people married much younger and it was widely expected that the bride's parents would pick up the cost.


Martha Stewart Weddings also makes note of the change:

Today, most people believe the couple should pay for their own wedding, especially if they have lived on their own for some time. Of course, parents often want to pitch in.

Reuters said there are a few factors to consider when deciding who will pay for the wedding:

 

Here are seven simple tips to help newbies in the credit world borrow money and build a credit history.

By MSN Money Partner Thu 11:34 AM

This post comes from Allison Martin at partner site Money Talks News. 


Money Talks News on MSN MoneyCredit is one of those things you don't want to be without. But, as we all know, the credit game is definitely a Catch-22. You need a good credit history to snag the best deals on loans, yet it's very difficult to get credit without a borrowing history.


So what's a consumer to do? Here's what to do when you're new to the credit world or are starting over after some kind of financial catastrophe.

 

Gasoline prices have experienced an uptick recently and will continue to edge up slightly as summer approaches.

By Money Staff Wed 5:12 PM

This post comes from Ellen Chang at partner site MainStreet.


MainStreet on MSN MoneyGasoline prices have experienced an uptick recently but will continue to edge up slightly as summer approaches, industry experts said.


Prices at gas pumps across the country are averaging $3.60 a gallon as temperatures rose slightly in some regions.


Buying gas © moodboard/CorbisGasbuddy.com found that gas reached $3.60 a gallon in many states. Marked exceptions on the low-end were Montana, where gasoline prices were $3.27 a gallon, and Texas, where gas was $3.47 a gallon. By contrast, California had gas as high as $4.17 in California, and Hawaii hit $4.28 a gallon.


Regular gasoline retail prices will continue to stay within this range and is projected to reach an average of $3.57 per gallon overall during the period of April through September, the Energy Information Administration said. The annual average regular gasoline retail price was $3.58 per gallon in 2013.


The projected national average regular retail gasoline price falls from $3.66 per gallon in May to $3.46 per gallon in September. The EIA expects regular gasoline retail prices to average $3.45 per gallon in 2014 and $3.37 per gallon in 2015, compared with $3.51 per gallon in 2013.


"After rising into May, the retail price is expected to fall through the remainder of the summer because both crude oil prices and gasoline crack spreads (the difference between wholesale product price and the price of crude oil) decline," the EIA said in its report.

 

Remember Murphy's Law? Make your finances rock solid with these 10 financial products.

By MSN Money Partner Apr 16, 2014 3:19PM

This post comes from Maryalene LaPonsie at partner site Money Talks News.


Money Talks News on MSN MoneyBeing money smart is about more than having a budget and eliminating dumb purchases. It means creating a financial foundation that will carry you and your family comfortably through whatever life throws your way.


Woman counting money © Jose Luis Pelaez Inc, Blend Images, Getty ImagesTo create that foundation and find lasting financial security, you need to own these 10 products. (Hint: You're about to hear a lot about insurance.)


1. Checking account

Let's start with the basics. You need to have a centralized place to manage and monitor your money. After all, it's hard to have a balanced budget if you have only a hazy idea of where your money is going.


Prepaid cards are an increasingly popular option, but they can come saddled with lots of fees. Plus, disclosures for these cards can be spotty, making it hard to know exactly how much your card is costing you.


Instead, look for a free checking account. Many institutions have scaled back their offerings, but there are still ways to get free checking from a bank or credit union.

 

Social Security has stopped trying to settle debts that are more than 10 years old by seizing tax refunds.

By MSN Money Partner Apr 16, 2014 2:42PM

This post comes from Krystal Steinmetz at partner site Money Talks News. 


Money Talks News on MSN MoneyThe Social Security Administration is backing off the controversial practice of seizing tax refunds to collect on decades-old debt.


Social Security Card © Tom Grill/Photographers Choice RF/Getty ImagesActing Social Security commissioner Carolyn Colvin issued the following statement  Monday:

I have directed an immediate halt to further referrals under the Treasury Offset Program to recover debts owed to the agency that are 10 years old and older pending a thorough review of our responsibility and discretion under the current law.

Colvin added, "If any Social Security or Supplemental Security Income beneficiary believes they have been incorrectly assessed with an overpayment under this program, I encourage them to request an explanation or seek options to resolve the overpayment."


It's a big deal, reports The Washington Post, which broke the story about the program's irregularities.

 

Eating healthy usually costs more, so some insurers are mailing out coupons to help out.

By Money Staff Apr 16, 2014 12:13PM

This post comes from Kelli B. Grant at partner site CNBC.


CNBC on MSN MoneyThe Sunday paper isn't the only game in town when it comes to printed grocery coupons: Some health insurers are sending discount mailers to consumers as an incentive to eat healthier.


By their measures, at least, there's some evidence that it's working. Among recipients of such mailings, purchases of healthy items (per USDA guidelines) grew 4.5 percent in 2012 to 43 percent of grocery spending, according to a white paper from Linkwell Health.

 

New York java junkies can use an app's prepaid plan to quaff as much coffee as they want, for a monthly rate.

By Money Staff Apr 16, 2014 11:47AM

This post comes from Caroline Winter at partner site Bloomberg BusinessWeek.


Bloomberg BusinessWeek on MSN MoneyNew York caffeine junkies, look alive: A new app called CUPS allows subscribers to pay $45 per month for unlimited coffee from almost 40 independent coffee shops around the city.


Designed by a small team from Israel, the app is intended as an alternative to the smartphone loyalty cards offered by the likes of Starbucks. "It’s a similar service," says Gilad Rotem, a co-founder of the startup, which is also called CUPS. "We’re offering a mobile app, prepaid plan, but it's for independent, higher-quality coffee."


 Coffee © HD Connelly, Getty ImagesNew Yorkers will pay $45 a month for brewed, drip, pour-over, or filtered coffee (or tea).


Latte drinkers will pay more: The unlimited espresso subscription costs $85 a month. Rotem says the prices are equivalent to about 22 cups, or roughly one java beverage per workday per month. On average, Americans consume 1.7 cups of coffee a day, according to Studylogic, which means a CUPS subscription may not be a bad deal. For coffee drinkers with a lower caffeine tolerance, CUPS also offers prepaid package deals for 5, 10, or 20 drinks per month.

 

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