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Here are six money moves that will help keep your finances and romance intact after you tie the knot.

By MSN Money Partner Fri 4:40 PM

This post comes from Allison Martin at partner site Money Talks News. 


Money Talks News on MSN MoneyOnce you've tied the knot and made it past the honeymoon phase, reality sets in. Love won't always save the day, but healthy communication offers a fighting chance.


Newlywed couple © Purestock/SuperStockSo while the two of you are sorting everything out and settling into your new life as one, a money talk should be at the top of the list of priorities -- if you haven't already gotten to it. And let's face it: Not all of you have done it.


Maybe you have an idea about your partner's perspective on how the finances should be handled, either from planning the wedding together or pre-marriage counseling. But now it's time to firm up your understanding of the general concepts and the details to alleviate the risk of arguments over money later on. They can destroy a marriage.


Yes, money is a difficult topic to address, but it's better to talk about it now, rather than grow disgruntled and angry because you haven't come to terms over it.


Here are six points you need to address:

 

Here's what you should know to protect yourself against new ATM skimming devices.

By MSN Money Partner Fri 4:23 PM

This post comes from Krystal Steinmetz at partner site Money Talks News.

 

Money Talks News on MSN MoneyUse of devices to fraudulently "skim" data from ATM cards so crooks can drain your bank account is nothing new. But skimmers have evolved, and the new devices are so small and thin, they're pretty easy to miss.


According to Krebs on Security, the European ATM Security Team -- a nonprofit group that collects information on ATM fraud -- said the new skimmers sit within the throat of the ATM card reading slot, making them difficult to detect. The skimmers are used in conjunction with hidden cameras, which record consumers' personal identification numbers as they type them in.


bank ATM (© Image Source/Corbis/Corbis)The U.S. is more at risk for subsequent fraud involving skimmed ATM data than most European countries because we haven't transitioned to more secure chip-and-PIN technology. According to Krebs:

"In countries where the ATM EMV rollout has been completed most losses have migrated away from Europe and are mainly seen in the USA, Asia-Pacific, and Latin America," the EAST report notes. "From the perspective of European card issuers the Asia-Pacific region seems to be eclipsing Latin America for such losses."

Fraudsters in Europe collect ATM card data, then send it to the U.S., where the data is encoded onto new (chipless) cards. Then crooks can pull out funds at ATM machines in the U.S. and Latin America, according to American Banker.

 

After a wreck, a fire or a storm, watch out for unsolicited offers of help. Let your insurance company earn its money instead.

By QuinStreet Fri 12:06 PM
This post comes from Susan Ladika at partner site Insurance.com.

Insurance.com on MSN MoneySay you've been in a wreck. Or your home has been damaged by a storm. Or your kitchen has gone up in flames.


You're shaken and dazed.


Ambulance with lights flashing © PBNJ Productions/Corbis
That's when the siren chasers strike -- trying to sign you up for services you don't need or can ill afford. If you fall prey to their scams, you could be on the hook for hundreds or thousands of dollars and might even lose your home.


I witnessed siren-chasing firsthand when my neighbor accidentally started a kitchen fire. Within minutes of the fire trucks pulling away after extinguishing the blaze, two fire restoration companies showed up at her home, trying to get her to hire them to make the repairs.


She sent them both packing and called her homeowners insurance company instead.


That decision drew praise from National Insurance Crime Bureau (NICB) spokesman Frank Scafidi, quoting the NICB mantra: "If you didn't request it, reject it."


"They're trying to take advantage of your emotions," Scafidi says.


They also are trying to take advantage of your wallet.

 

Take a trip and save on purchases of diamonds, electronics, leather, and even health care.

By Cheapism.com Fri 11:20 AM
This post comes from Tahirah Blanding at partner site Cheapism.com.

Cheapism.com on MSN MoneyTraveling abroad for vacation is a surefire way to de-stress and unwind. It's also the perfect time to score deals on products and services that are normally more expensive in the United States.

Woman wearing a diamond necklace © Image Source, CorbisWhether you're heading south to Central America or going as far as Southeast Asia, you'll be in or near hotspots for cheap medical services, leather, electronics, and even precious gems. We can't vouch for the safety or quality of the products or services mentioned below, but our research suggests that they're generally cheaper than what you'd find at home.
 

There are many ways to save money, but some cost you more than you think.

By Cheapism.com Jul 18, 2014 11:04AM
This post comes from Emily Lugg at partner site Cheapism.com.

Cheapism.com on MSN MoneyWho doesn't want to save a few bucks? Indeed, there are some tried and true ways to cut costs -- couponing, watching for sales, shopping the discount aisle, and so on. Then there are money-saving strategies that actually may be illusory. Perhaps it's time to rethink your cheapskate ways to ensure that you're truly cutting into your bottom line.

Do you ...

Pennies © CorbisDrive extra miles to save money on gas? Yes, the gas station near your best friend's house may be three cents or even 30 cents a gallon cheaper, but it's on the other side of town. By the time you drive there, fill up, and drive home, your cheapskate ways have burned extra time (which counts for something, too) and also any savings you may have racked up.
 

Your car's vehicle identification number (VIN) may look random, but it is anything but.

By QuinStreet Jul 17, 2014 4:48PM
This post comes from Barbara Marquand at partner site Insure.com.

Insure.com on MSN MoneyYour car's vehicle identification number, commonly known as a VIN, may look like a meaningless string of random numbers and letters.


But together those 17 digits make up an impressive one-of-a-kind combination, following the car from the factory to the scrap heap.


A VIN tag © SQUIB/Alamy"A VIN is to a car what a fingerprint is to a person," says Frank Scafidi, spokesperson for the National Insurance Crime Bureau (NICB).


A variety of agencies and companies use VINs to report and access information about vehicles. Thanks to the VIN, a car insurance company can check whether a car has a salvage title, a body shop can order the right parts for repairs and police can identify stolen vehicles.


You can find your car's VIN on the dashboard near the windshield and inside the doorframe on the driver's side. On some cars, the VIN is located on additional parts, such as the bumpers or steering column. The locations are based on the car's theft risk and are standardized by the U.S. Department of Transportation. The VIN also appears on documents, such as your car title, registration and auto insurance ID card.

 

If you're looking for some nontraditional options for purchasing inexpensive and nutritious foods, we have some ideas for you.

By MSN Money Partner Jul 17, 2014 1:32PM

This post comes from Kimberly Winkowitsch  at partner site Money Talks News


Money Talks News on MSN MoneyA couple of years ago, I was feeling especially thrifty. My husband farms both organic and traditional wheat, barley, lentils and peas, so I thought I should make use of what he grows.


I ground some of his organic wheat in the dry container on my blender and made my own homemade bread. To my surprise, it turned out really good. I've had more than a few domestic fails over the years, so I was pretty excited about my bread success.


Shopping cart © Claus Christensen, PhotographerI decided to go all out and bake all of our bread with our very own wheat.


I watched bread-baking YouTube videos, I bought lots of bread pans and supplies, and I even found a used grain grinder.


I was really having fun and impressing my family, but there was one problem. We ate so much bread that we started gaining weight at an alarming rate. Because I'm trying to keep us at a healthy weight, I put away my bread-baking supplies. (My new focus is making green smoothies.)


But here's my point: There are inexpensive alternatives to buying food at the grocery store, whether it's getting it directly from the local farmers and ranchers who produce it, or from cooperatives and other groups. You can save money and have more control over the source and quality of the food your family eats.


Here are some options:

 

Check out our big list of 10 money-saving ideas that will work in Worcester, Massachusetts, Waikiki Beach and all points in between.

By MSN Money Partner Jul 17, 2014 1:13PM

This post comes from Maryalene LaPonsie at partner site Money Talks News.


Money Talks News on MSN MoneyIt's summertime, and that means we here at Money Talks News have been busy brainstorming and researching ways for you to save on your vacation. Recently, we've told you whether travel insurance is a good buy, pulled back the curtain on the world's most expensive cities, and advised on how best to book a flight for the family.


Now we've compiled a big list of ways to save 50 percent on your travel costs, regardless of whether you're going by plane, train or automobile.

 

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