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How to make an extra $1,000 a month

If you're in debt, every little bit helps. Here are some ideas to put more cash in your pocket.

By Credit.com Aug 5, 2014 2:41PM
This post comes from Christine DiGangi at partner site Credit.com.

Credit.com on MSN MoneyGetting out of debt can be tricky for one very simple reason: It's expensive. You fell into debt because you bought things you couldn't fit into your budget in the first place, and that usually doesn't get easier as time goes on, especially because the debt will likely have accrued interest, as well.


Man Taking Money Out of Wallet © NULL/CorbisOther than cutting back on a variety of expenses, the simplest thing you can do to help get out of debt is make more money. Of course, simple isn't always easy, and assuming you're already working full-time, it can be extremely tricky to supplement your income.


Get creative about making money

There are few places to start when looking for extra money, and many of them are in your own home. First, you can sell things you don't need, like used books and sporting equipment, and you have a variety of channels for doing so. There are Internet marketplaces, you can have a garage sale, and you can work with a local consignment, pawn or secondhand shop to sell your things.


That's more of a one-time bonus than regular bump in income, though. For a steadier increase in cashflow, consider monetizing one of your hobbies, whether that's offering music lessons, selling crafty goods or teaching a fitness class. These options may mean you have to spend before you can earn (whether that's on marketing, certification or supplies), but eventually, you could produce a lucrative side business.


You could always just look around for part-time jobs that fit your schedule, but if you already have your fill of "working for the man," don't worry -- there are plenty more ideas you can come up with.


In a post from a few years ago, a Redditor asked the community for ways to legally make an extra $1,000 a month to help save a down payment for a house. The more than 5,700 responses included ideas from the typical to the bizarre, and many of them are worthwhile enterprises for people in need of more money. Here are a few to consider (or to help kick-start your imagination):


1. Search the Craigslist odd jobs section
Beware of scammers and people soliciting illegal activity, however.


2. Sell blood plasma
You can do this regularly, but it's not going to make you rich. Various online sources say you'll get compensated between $20 and $40 for your time, and that figure may go up if you regularly contribute. You have to meet physical requirements and answer a questionnaire, but it's a way to earn cash for minimal effort. Bodily fluids can be another source of income for young men who qualify as sperm donors, but that process can be more intense than selling plasma every few days or months.


3. Tutor
Whether you have a flair for math, writing, foreign languages or computer programming, you can probably help someone learn and get paid for it. You can do this on your own or through private tutoring centers.


4. Dumpster dive
People throw out good things you can sell (or inexpensively repair and sell). If skulking around for treasures left on the curb or abandoned in an alley isn't your cup of tea, you can accomplish similar feats at thrift shops. Don't forget to look into posting fees on sites like eBay that can cut into your profit.


5. Take surveys
There are some that pay a bit in cash (about $5 per survey), while others are points-based rewards. Search for reputable sites.


6. Walk Dogs
Make sure you actually like dogs and are prepared to make the time commitment.


7. Participate in medical trials
This isn't a decision to take lightly, and you'll want to do plenty of homework before you start swallowing pills and taking injections in the name of science.


A lot of these paths require a significant investment of time to be truly profitable, so think carefully before starting your new business venture. It may be easier for you to analyze your spending habits and make cuts rather than conjure a secondary income source. Most important, make sure you're not losing money while trying to save -- you can easily get caught up in buying things to flip and never sell them, or you may invest in materials for monetizing your hobby and end up in the red.


You'll have to find ways to save throughout your life, whether it's to pay down debt  or fund a milestone purchase, so don't be afraid to experiment. Realistically assess how much time you can dedicate to a side project, and keep an eye on your finances along the way. And if you're like the Redditor who posed the fantastic question of how to squirrel away more money for a down payment on a home, keep in mind that your credit will have a huge impact on your mortgage payment and interest rate. You can check your credit scores for free once a month on Credit.com


More from Credit.com


209Comments
Aug 5, 2014 3:32PM
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In order to get by in this LOUSY Economy, you now have to resort to being a guinea pig for medical trials, dumpster diving, and selling your blood. 
Aug 5, 2014 3:59PM
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WOW !!! This Article is about to change my life!  Sell Plasma?!!! Dumpster Dive?!!! Duh...... Where have these BRILLIANT Enterprise Ideas been all my life! Land O' Milk & Honey here we come!!!! 
Aug 5, 2014 3:31PM
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Can't I just print it like the Government does?
Aug 5, 2014 4:27PM
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They forgot to include write articles for MSN Money on the list.  On the negative side it probably doesn't pay much, but it looks like they will let just about anyone do it based on the body of work I have seen.
Aug 5, 2014 5:08PM
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Hope & Change........Hope & Change..........YES WE CAN!!!

1. Search the Craigslist odd jobs section

2. Sell blood plasma

3. Tutor

4. Dumpster dive

5. Take surveys

6. Walk Dogs

7. Participate in medical trials

8. Get a Full Frontal Lobotomy


Aug 5, 2014 3:19PM
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Then of course there's always the world's oldest profession....
Aug 5, 2014 4:42PM
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Yes, my new hobby will be dumpster diving.  When I'm not diving, I'll be tutoring others on how to dumpster dive or be taking surveys.  Should rise to that 1% top in a year or two if I work real hard!  
Aug 5, 2014 3:59PM
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Wow! 3rd world comes to America. Great suggestions MSN. Just remember hold your head up high when doing these things cause noway anyone would see this as a person down on there luck. Tonights new reports of live TV broadcast of people scrounging landfills for food. America we be getting there. HOPE! LMAO!!!
Aug 5, 2014 5:58PM
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Right after diving into filthy garbage dumpsters, register for a medical experiment....

Genius!!

Ever hear of something  we used to have called a J.O.B. ?

Oh, right, they don't exist anymore.....They were exported to China and South America.




Aug 5, 2014 4:48PM
Aug 5, 2014 4:52PM
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I would like to see the **** who wrote this article do these things so that you can tell your readers, that by experience and by example you know what they are going through when they have to resort to these types of activities.
Aug 5, 2014 5:10PM
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you cant make money doing this stuff who wrote this rubbish
Aug 5, 2014 3:44PM
Aug 5, 2014 5:25PM
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      The good old USA is not what it use to be when you got to go out and sell your blood, your sperm, be a lab rat or take a dumpster dive to survive. You should have listed selling your as too since that's a real good money maker for all the politicians in Washington.
Aug 5, 2014 5:16PM
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I don't think I'll be dumpster diving at my age. Being used as a guinea pig for a pharmaceutical company. That's never going to happen. Let them stuff their drugs where the monkey puts his nuts.
Aug 5, 2014 4:55PM
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People are smarter than this. In this economy, most don't throw things out if they can be easily fixed, and if the person doesn't know how to fix things, they'll try to sell it on eBay or at a garage sale. 

Buying something from a thrift store with the intent of reselling it is asinine. Thrift stores charge three times what an item is worth to begin with. 

I don't see robbery as an option. It seems to be very popular with the people in my neighborhood. 
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Very few places will pay for plasma these days and if they do they're so picky that a lot of folks can't donate it just like when they complain about low blood donations but turn half the people away. Dumpster diving will get you arrested or give you tetanus.
Aug 5, 2014 5:09PM
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You're going to need some Claritin-D, Drano, antifreeze, matches, ether, brake fluid and a few other everyday items.
Aug 6, 2014 5:27AM
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Hollywood, doctors and pro athletes get paid wayyyyy to much! I just read in the news that the cast members of The Big Bang Theory sit com just got a raise. Each of the main actors are now getting 1 Million per episode per season now for doing what they love to do! That kind of money is beyond belief for one persons income. Let's see! I wonder how long it would take the average low wage hard working american to make 1 Million Dollars? We really need a new system. Are you with me people?
Aug 5, 2014 6:04PM
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