Apple sets the tone

Although its issues are self-inflicted, it's holding back the rest of the market.

By Jim Cramer Oct 3, 2012 8:48AM

theStreet.com logoAppleIs it Apple (AAPL) tick by tick? Lots of people have been speculating how important Apple has become to the market. Given that it is 20% of the Nasdaq ($COMPX), we know it's a huge deal to that index.

 

But can this market rally without Apple, even intraday?

 

Here's my take. You may not be able to pin down the correlation, but it has become highly unlikely to have a big rally in this market without Apple's participating, if only because it has become ingrained in the American stock psyche like no other stock I have ever seen.

 

It simply colors everything, and when it goes down, there is a presumption that something is very wrong, and if it is very wrong with Apple, it has to be really wrong for everything else, except perhaps for its enemy, Google (GOOG).

 

Now, here's a bit of semicircular reasoning, but if you were to take Apple out of the indexes so they wouldn't be biased by it, I still don't think the impact would be lessened. This stock has become the heart and soul of stock trading, and everyone and his brother seems to have a chart of where it fails and where it holds and where it bounces to and where it gets repelled.

Until it gets back into a gentle rise, something that can happen as it changes the tenor of the Maps discussion -- hey, it can happen, as Steve Jobs changed the tenor of the antenna discussion -- I think we are going to be trapped by it in one form or another.

 

It's just too important.

 

This is a shame. Apple's issues are really self-inflicted. It could have kept Google Maps for now while working on its own system, which I have now used and believe is, theoretically, far superior to Google's, except that it doesn't have the right information programmed into it.

 

But until Apple comes up with something better than an "I am sorry" answer, I think we are going to be reading off the Apple chart, and that means we are in no man's land, which means the overall market might be in no man's land, too.

 

Jim Cramer, TheStreet.com

 

Jim Cramer is a co-founder of TheStreet and contributes daily market commentary to the financial news network's sites. Follow his trades for Action Alerts PLUS, which Cramer co-manages as a charitable trust and is long AAPL.

 

 

 

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18Comments
Oct 3, 2012 12:26PM
avatar

theStreet.com logoAppleIs it Apple (AAPL) tick by tick? Lots of people have been speculating how important Apple has become to the market. Given that it is 20% of the Nasdaq ($COMPX), we know it's a huge deal to that index.

 

But can this market rally without Apple, even intraday?

 

Here's my take. You may not be able to pin down the correlation, but it has become highly unlikely to have a big rally in this market without Apple's participating, if only because it has become ingrained in the American stock psyche like no other stock I have ever seen.

 

It simply colors everything, and when it goes down, there is a presumption that something is very wrong, and if it is very wrong with Apple, it has to be really wrong for everything else, except perhaps for its enemy, Google (GOOG).

 

Now, here's a bit of semicircular reasoning, but if you were to take Apple out of the indexes so they wouldn't be biased by it, I still don't think the impact would be lessened. This stock has become the heart and soul of stock trading, and everyone and his brother seems to have a chart of where it fails and where it holds and where it bounces to and where it gets repelled.

Until it gets back into a gentle rise, something that can happen as it changes the tenor of the Maps discussion -- hey, it can happen, as Steve Jobs changed the tenor of the antenna discussion -- I think we are going to be trapped by it in one form or another.

 

It's just too important.

 

This is a shame. Apple's issues are really self-inflicted. It could have kept Google Maps for now while working on its own system, which I have now used and believe is, theoretically, far superior to Google's, except that it doesn't have the right information programmed into it.

 

But until Apple comes up with something better than an "I am sorry" answer, I think we are going to be reading off the Apple chart, and that means we are in no man's land, which means the overall market might be in no man's land, too.

 

Jim Cramer, TheStreet.com

 

Jim Cramer is a co-founder of TheStreet and contributes daily market commentary to the financial news network's sites. Follow his trades for Action Alerts PLUS, which Cramer co-manages as a charitable trust and is long AAPL.

 

 

 

More from TheStreet.com

Oct 3, 2012 11:53AM
avatar

theStreet.com logoAppleIs it Apple (AAPL) tick by tick? Lots of people have been speculating how important Apple has become to the market. Given that it is 20% of the Nasdaq ($COMPX), we know it's a huge deal to that index.

 

But can this market rally without Apple, even intraday?

 

Here's my take. You may not be able to pin down the correlation, but it has become highly unlikely to have a big rally in this market without Apple's participating, if only because it has become ingrained in the American stock psyche like no other stock I have ever seen.

 

It simply colors everything, and when it goes down, there is a presumption that something is very wrong, and if it is very wrong with Apple, it has to be really wrong for everything else, except perhaps for its enemy, Google (GOOG).

 

Now, here's a bit of semicircular reasoning, but if you were to take Apple out of the indexes so they wouldn't be biased by it, I still don't think the impact would be lessened. This stock has become the heart and soul of stock trading, and everyone and his brother seems to have a chart of where it fails and where it holds and where it bounces to and where it gets repelled.

Until it gets back into a gentle rise, something that can happen as it changes the tenor of the Maps discussion -- hey, it can happen, as Steve Jobs changed the tenor of the antenna discussion -- I think we are going to be trapped by it in one form or another.

 

It's just too important.

 

This is a shame. Apple's issues are really self-inflicted. It could have kept Google Maps for now while working on its own system, which I have now used and believe is, theoretically, far superior to Google's, except that it doesn't have the right information programmed into it.

 

But until Apple comes up with something better than an "I am sorry" answer, I think we are going to be reading off the Apple chart, and that means we are in no man's land, which means the overall market might be in no man's land, too.

 

Jim Cramer, TheStreet.com

 

Jim Cramer is a co-founder of TheStreet and contributes daily market commentary to the financial news network's sites. Follow his trades for Action Alerts PLUS, which Cramer co-manages as a charitable trust and is long AAPL.

 

 

 

More from TheStreet.com

Oct 3, 2012 4:04PM
avatar

theStreet.com logoAppleIs it Apple (AAPL) tick by tick? Lots of people have been speculating how important Apple has become to the market. Given that it is 20% of the Nasdaq ($COMPX), we know it's a huge deal to that index.

 

But can this market rally without Apple, even intraday?

 

Here's my take. You may not be able to pin down the correlation, but it has become highly unlikely to have a big rally in this market without Apple's participating, if only because it has become ingrained in the American stock psyche like no other stock I have ever seen.

 

It simply colors everything, and when it goes down, there is a presumption that something is very wrong, and if it is very wrong with Apple, it has to be really wrong for everything else, except perhaps for its enemy, Google (GOOG).

 

Now, here's a bit of semicircular reasoning, but if you were to take Apple out of the indexes so they wouldn't be biased by it, I still don't think the impact would be lessened. This stock has become the heart and soul of stock trading, and everyone and his brother seems to have a chart of where it fails and where it holds and where it bounces to and where it gets repelled.

Until it gets back into a gentle rise, something that can happen as it changes the tenor of the Maps discussion -- hey, it can happen, as Steve Jobs changed the tenor of the antenna discussion -- I think we are going to be trapped by it in one form or another.

 

It's just too important.

 

This is a shame. Apple's issues are really self-inflicted. It could have kept Google Maps for now while working on its own system, which I have now used and believe is, theoretically, far superior to Google's, except that it doesn't have the right information programmed into it.

 

But until Apple comes up with something better than an "I am sorry" answer, I think we are going to be reading off the Apple chart, and that means we are in no man's land, which means the overall market might be in no man's land, too.

 

Jim Cramer, TheStreet.com

 

Jim Cramer is a co-founder of TheStreet and contributes daily market commentary to the financial news network's sites. Follow his trades for Action Alerts PLUS, which Cramer co-manages as a charitable trust and is long AAPL.

 

 

 

More from TheStreet.com

Oct 3, 2012 1:46PM
avatar

theStreet.com logoAppleIs it Apple (AAPL) tick by tick? Lots of people have been speculating how important Apple has become to the market. Given that it is 20% of the Nasdaq ($COMPX), we know it's a huge deal to that index.

 

But can this market rally without Apple, even intraday?

 

Here's my take. You may not be able to pin down the correlation, but it has become highly unlikely to have a big rally in this market without Apple's participating, if only because it has become ingrained in the American stock psyche like no other stock I have ever seen.

 

It simply colors everything, and when it goes down, there is a presumption that something is very wrong, and if it is very wrong with Apple, it has to be really wrong for everything else, except perhaps for its enemy, Google (GOOG).

 

Now, here's a bit of semicircular reasoning, but if you were to take Apple out of the indexes so they wouldn't be biased by it, I still don't think the impact would be lessened. This stock has become the heart and soul of stock trading, and everyone and his brother seems to have a chart of where it fails and where it holds and where it bounces to and where it gets repelled.

Until it gets back into a gentle rise, something that can happen as it changes the tenor of the Maps discussion -- hey, it can happen, as Steve Jobs changed the tenor of the antenna discussion -- I think we are going to be trapped by it in one form or another.

 

It's just too important.

 

This is a shame. Apple's issues are really self-inflicted. It could have kept Google Maps for now while working on its own system, which I have now used and believe is, theoretically, far superior to Google's, except that it doesn't have the right information programmed into it.

 

But until Apple comes up with something better than an "I am sorry" answer, I think we are going to be reading off the Apple chart, and that means we are in no man's land, which means the overall market might be in no man's land, too.

 

Jim Cramer, TheStreet.com

 

Jim Cramer is a co-founder of TheStreet and contributes daily market commentary to the financial news network's sites. Follow his trades for Action Alerts PLUS, which Cramer co-manages as a charitable trust and is long AAPL.

 

 

 

More from TheStreet.com

Oct 3, 2012 2:17PM
avatar

theStreet.com logoAppleIs it Apple (AAPL) tick by tick? Lots of people have been speculating how important Apple has become to the market. Given that it is 20% of the Nasdaq ($COMPX), we know it's a huge deal to that index.

 

But can this market rally without Apple, even intraday?

 

Here's my take. You may not be able to pin down the correlation, but it has become highly unlikely to have a big rally in this market without Apple's participating, if only because it has become ingrained in the American stock psyche like no other stock I have ever seen.

 

It simply colors everything, and when it goes down, there is a presumption that something is very wrong, and if it is very wrong with Apple, it has to be really wrong for everything else, except perhaps for its enemy, Google (GOOG).

 

Now, here's a bit of semicircular reasoning, but if you were to take Apple out of the indexes so they wouldn't be biased by it, I still don't think the impact would be lessened. This stock has become the heart and soul of stock trading, and everyone and his brother seems to have a chart of where it fails and where it holds and where it bounces to and where it gets repelled.

Until it gets back into a gentle rise, something that can happen as it changes the tenor of the Maps discussion -- hey, it can happen, as Steve Jobs changed the tenor of the antenna discussion -- I think we are going to be trapped by it in one form or another.

 

It's just too important.

 

This is a shame. Apple's issues are really self-inflicted. It could have kept Google Maps for now while working on its own system, which I have now used and believe is, theoretically, far superior to Google's, except that it doesn't have the right information programmed into it.

 

But until Apple comes up with something better than an "I am sorry" answer, I think we are going to be reading off the Apple chart, and that means we are in no man's land, which means the overall market might be in no man's land, too.

 

Jim Cramer, TheStreet.com

 

Jim Cramer is a co-founder of TheStreet and contributes daily market commentary to the financial news network's sites. Follow his trades for Action Alerts PLUS, which Cramer co-manages as a charitable trust and is long AAPL.

 

 

 

More from TheStreet.com

Oct 3, 2012 3:26PM
avatar

theStreet.com logoAppleIs it Apple (AAPL) tick by tick? Lots of people have been speculating how important Apple has become to the market. Given that it is 20% of the Nasdaq ($COMPX), we know it's a huge deal to that index.

 

But can this market rally without Apple, even intraday?

 

Here's my take. You may not be able to pin down the correlation, but it has become highly unlikely to have a big rally in this market without Apple's participating, if only because it has become ingrained in the American stock psyche like no other stock I have ever seen.

 

It simply colors everything, and when it goes down, there is a presumption that something is very wrong, and if it is very wrong with Apple, it has to be really wrong for everything else, except perhaps for its enemy, Google (GOOG).

 

Now, here's a bit of semicircular reasoning, but if you were to take Apple out of the indexes so they wouldn't be biased by it, I still don't think the impact would be lessened. This stock has become the heart and soul of stock trading, and everyone and his brother seems to have a chart of where it fails and where it holds and where it bounces to and where it gets repelled.

Until it gets back into a gentle rise, something that can happen as it changes the tenor of the Maps discussion -- hey, it can happen, as Steve Jobs changed the tenor of the antenna discussion -- I think we are going to be trapped by it in one form or another.

 

It's just too important.

 

This is a shame. Apple's issues are really self-inflicted. It could have kept Google Maps for now while working on its own system, which I have now used and believe is, theoretically, far superior to Google's, except that it doesn't have the right information programmed into it.

 

But until Apple comes up with something better than an "I am sorry" answer, I think we are going to be reading off the Apple chart, and that means we are in no man's land, which means the overall market might be in no man's land, too.

 

Jim Cramer, TheStreet.com

 

Jim Cramer is a co-founder of TheStreet and contributes daily market commentary to the financial news network's sites. Follow his trades for Action Alerts PLUS, which Cramer co-manages as a charitable trust and is long AAPL.

 

 

 

More from TheStreet.com

Oct 3, 2012 5:24PM
avatar

theStreet.com logoAppleIs it Apple (AAPL) tick by tick? Lots of people have been speculating how important Apple has become to the market. Given that it is 20% of the Nasdaq ($COMPX), we know it's a huge deal to that index.

 

But can this market rally without Apple, even intraday?

 

Here's my take. You may not be able to pin down the correlation, but it has become highly unlikely to have a big rally in this market without Apple's participating, if only because it has become ingrained in the American stock psyche like no other stock I have ever seen.

 

It simply colors everything, and when it goes down, there is a presumption that something is very wrong, and if it is very wrong with Apple, it has to be really wrong for everything else, except perhaps for its enemy, Google (GOOG).

 

Now, here's a bit of semicircular reasoning, but if you were to take Apple out of the indexes so they wouldn't be biased by it, I still don't think the impact would be lessened. This stock has become the heart and soul of stock trading, and everyone and his brother seems to have a chart of where it fails and where it holds and where it bounces to and where it gets repelled.

Until it gets back into a gentle rise, something that can happen as it changes the tenor of the Maps discussion -- hey, it can happen, as Steve Jobs changed the tenor of the antenna discussion -- I think we are going to be trapped by it in one form or another.

 

It's just too important.

 

This is a shame. Apple's issues are really self-inflicted. It could have kept Google Maps for now while working on its own system, which I have now used and believe is, theoretically, far superior to Google's, except that it doesn't have the right information programmed into it.

 

But until Apple comes up with something better than an "I am sorry" answer, I think we are going to be reading off the Apple chart, and that means we are in no man's land, which means the overall market might be in no man's land, too.

 

Jim Cramer, TheStreet.com

 

Jim Cramer is a co-founder of TheStreet and contributes daily market commentary to the financial news network's sites. Follow his trades for Action Alerts PLUS, which Cramer co-manages as a charitable trust and is long AAPL.

 

 

 

More from TheStreet.com

Oct 3, 2012 5:41PM
avatar

theStreet.com logoAppleIs it Apple (AAPL) tick by tick? Lots of people have been speculating how important Apple has become to the market. Given that it is 20% of the Nasdaq ($COMPX), we know it's a huge deal to that index.

 

But can this market rally without Apple, even intraday?

 

Here's my take. You may not be able to pin down the correlation, but it has become highly unlikely to have a big rally in this market without Apple's participating, if only because it has become ingrained in the American stock psyche like no other stock I have ever seen.

 

It simply colors everything, and when it goes down, there is a presumption that something is very wrong, and if it is very wrong with Apple, it has to be really wrong for everything else, except perhaps for its enemy, Google (GOOG).

 

Now, here's a bit of semicircular reasoning, but if you were to take Apple out of the indexes so they wouldn't be biased by it, I still don't think the impact would be lessened. This stock has become the heart and soul of stock trading, and everyone and his brother seems to have a chart of where it fails and where it holds and where it bounces to and where it gets repelled.

Until it gets back into a gentle rise, something that can happen as it changes the tenor of the Maps discussion -- hey, it can happen, as Steve Jobs changed the tenor of the antenna discussion -- I think we are going to be trapped by it in one form or another.

 

It's just too important.

 

This is a shame. Apple's issues are really self-inflicted. It could have kept Google Maps for now while working on its own system, which I have now used and believe is, theoretically, far superior to Google's, except that it doesn't have the right information programmed into it.

 

But until Apple comes up with something better than an "I am sorry" answer, I think we are going to be reading off the Apple chart, and that means we are in no man's land, which means the overall market might be in no man's land, too.

 

Jim Cramer, TheStreet.com

 

Jim Cramer is a co-founder of TheStreet and contributes daily market commentary to the financial news network's sites. Follow his trades for Action Alerts PLUS, which Cramer co-manages as a charitable trust and is long AAPL.

 

 

 

More from TheStreet.com

Oct 3, 2012 8:47PM
avatar

theStreet.com logoAppleIs it Apple (AAPL) tick by tick? Lots of people have been speculating how important Apple has become to the market. Given that it is 20% of the Nasdaq ($COMPX), we know it's a huge deal to that index.

 

But can this market rally without Apple, even intraday?

 

Here's my take. You may not be able to pin down the correlation, but it has become highly unlikely to have a big rally in this market without Apple's participating, if only because it has become ingrained in the American stock psyche like no other stock I have ever seen.

 

It simply colors everything, and when it goes down, there is a presumption that something is very wrong, and if it is very wrong with Apple, it has to be really wrong for everything else, except perhaps for its enemy, Google (GOOG).

 

Now, here's a bit of semicircular reasoning, but if you were to take Apple out of the indexes so they wouldn't be biased by it, I still don't think the impact would be lessened. This stock has become the heart and soul of stock trading, and everyone and his brother seems to have a chart of where it fails and where it holds and where it bounces to and where it gets repelled.

Until it gets back into a gentle rise, something that can happen as it changes the tenor of the Maps discussion -- hey, it can happen, as Steve Jobs changed the tenor of the antenna discussion -- I think we are going to be trapped by it in one form or another.

 

It's just too important.

 

This is a shame. Apple's issues are really self-inflicted. It could have kept Google Maps for now while working on its own system, which I have now used and believe is, theoretically, far superior to Google's, except that it doesn't have the right information programmed into it.

 

But until Apple comes up with something better than an "I am sorry" answer, I think we are going to be reading off the Apple chart, and that means we are in no man's land, which means the overall market might be in no man's land, too.

 

Jim Cramer, TheStreet.com

 

Jim Cramer is a co-founder of TheStreet and contributes daily market commentary to the financial news network's sites. Follow his trades for Action Alerts PLUS, which Cramer co-manages as a charitable trust and is long AAPL.

 

 

 

More from TheStreet.com

Oct 3, 2012 3:16PM
avatar

theStreet.com logoAppleIs it Apple (AAPL) tick by tick? Lots of people have been speculating how important Apple has become to the market. Given that it is 20% of the Nasdaq ($COMPX), we know it's a huge deal to that index.

 

But can this market rally without Apple, even intraday?

 

Here's my take. You may not be able to pin down the correlation, but it has become highly unlikely to have a big rally in this market without Apple's participating, if only because it has become ingrained in the American stock psyche like no other stock I have ever seen.

 

It simply colors everything, and when it goes down, there is a presumption that something is very wrong, and if it is very wrong with Apple, it has to be really wrong for everything else, except perhaps for its enemy, Google (GOOG).

 

Now, here's a bit of semicircular reasoning, but if you were to take Apple out of the indexes so they wouldn't be biased by it, I still don't think the impact would be lessened. This stock has become the heart and soul of stock trading, and everyone and his brother seems to have a chart of where it fails and where it holds and where it bounces to and where it gets repelled.

Until it gets back into a gentle rise, something that can happen as it changes the tenor of the Maps discussion -- hey, it can happen, as Steve Jobs changed the tenor of the antenna discussion -- I think we are going to be trapped by it in one form or another.

 

It's just too important.

 

This is a shame. Apple's issues are really self-inflicted. It could have kept Google Maps for now while working on its own system, which I have now used and believe is, theoretically, far superior to Google's, except that it doesn't have the right information programmed into it.

 

But until Apple comes up with something better than an "I am sorry" answer, I think we are going to be reading off the Apple chart, and that means we are in no man's land, which means the overall market might be in no man's land, too.

 

Jim Cramer, TheStreet.com

 

Jim Cramer is a co-founder of TheStreet and contributes daily market commentary to the financial news network's sites. Follow his trades for Action Alerts PLUS, which Cramer co-manages as a charitable trust and is long AAPL.

 

 

 

More from TheStreet.com

Oct 3, 2012 3:09PM
avatar

theStreet.com logoAppleIs it Apple (AAPL) tick by tick? Lots of people have been speculating how important Apple has become to the market. Given that it is 20% of the Nasdaq ($COMPX), we know it's a huge deal to that index.

 

But can this market rally without Apple, even intraday?

 

Here's my take. You may not be able to pin down the correlation, but it has become highly unlikely to have a big rally in this market without Apple's participating, if only because it has become ingrained in the American stock psyche like no other stock I have ever seen.

 

It simply colors everything, and when it goes down, there is a presumption that something is very wrong, and if it is very wrong with Apple, it has to be really wrong for everything else, except perhaps for its enemy, Google (GOOG).

 

Now, here's a bit of semicircular reasoning, but if you were to take Apple out of the indexes so they wouldn't be biased by it, I still don't think the impact would be lessened. This stock has become the heart and soul of stock trading, and everyone and his brother seems to have a chart of where it fails and where it holds and where it bounces to and where it gets repelled.

Until it gets back into a gentle rise, something that can happen as it changes the tenor of the Maps discussion -- hey, it can happen, as Steve Jobs changed the tenor of the antenna discussion -- I think we are going to be trapped by it in one form or another.

 

It's just too important.

 

This is a shame. Apple's issues are really self-inflicted. It could have kept Google Maps for now while working on its own system, which I have now used and believe is, theoretically, far superior to Google's, except that it doesn't have the right information programmed into it.

 

But until Apple comes up with something better than an "I am sorry" answer, I think we are going to be reading off the Apple chart, and that means we are in no man's land, which means the overall market might be in no man's land, too.

 

Jim Cramer, TheStreet.com

 

Jim Cramer is a co-founder of TheStreet and contributes daily market commentary to the financial news network's sites. Follow his trades for Action Alerts PLUS, which Cramer co-manages as a charitable trust and is long AAPL.

 

 

 

More from TheStreet.com

Oct 3, 2012 9:32AM
avatar

theStreet.com logoAppleIs it Apple (AAPL) tick by tick? Lots of people have been speculating how important Apple has become to the market. Given that it is 20% of the Nasdaq ($COMPX), we know it's a huge deal to that index.

 

But can this market rally without Apple, even intraday?

 

Here's my take. You may not be able to pin down the correlation, but it has become highly unlikely to have a big rally in this market without Apple's participating, if only because it has become ingrained in the American stock psyche like no other stock I have ever seen.

 

It simply colors everything, and when it goes down, there is a presumption that something is very wrong, and if it is very wrong with Apple, it has to be really wrong for everything else, except perhaps for its enemy, Google (GOOG).

 

Now, here's a bit of semicircular reasoning, but if you were to take Apple out of the indexes so they wouldn't be biased by it, I still don't think the impact would be lessened. This stock has become the heart and soul of stock trading, and everyone and his brother seems to have a chart of where it fails and where it holds and where it bounces to and where it gets repelled.

Until it gets back into a gentle rise, something that can happen as it changes the tenor of the Maps discussion -- hey, it can happen, as Steve Jobs changed the tenor of the antenna discussion -- I think we are going to be trapped by it in one form or another.

 

It's just too important.

 

This is a shame. Apple's issues are really self-inflicted. It could have kept Google Maps for now while working on its own system, which I have now used and believe is, theoretically, far superior to Google's, except that it doesn't have the right information programmed into it.

 

But until Apple comes up with something better than an "I am sorry" answer, I think we are going to be reading off the Apple chart, and that means we are in no man's land, which means the overall market might be in no man's land, too.

 

Jim Cramer, TheStreet.com

 

Jim Cramer is a co-founder of TheStreet and contributes daily market commentary to the financial news network's sites. Follow his trades for Action Alerts PLUS, which Cramer co-manages as a charitable trust and is long AAPL.

 

 

 

More from TheStreet.com

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